Quick Review (LP): John Wesley Harding by Bob Dylan


Bob Dylan
John Wesley Harding
Columbia; 1967

My Rating: B (68/100)

Best Tracks: "I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight", "All Along The Watchtower", "The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest"

How does the righteous rebel rebel against rebellion?

NOTES
– He certainly sounds different. That accident must have shook him up.
– According to Wikipedia, recorded in 12 hours over 3 days in Nashville. That’s a quick turnaround.
– Almost had Robbie Robertson and Garth Hudson on it.
– "Don’t go mistaking paradise for that home across the road…"
– Stripped down, low key, warm yet shaded.
– It’s interesting how subdued the arrangements are here, especially considering he made Blonde On Blonde, the biggest sounding rock record up to that point, a year earlier.
– Many of the songs feel like he’s pulling up short, like they are sketches. It’s a nice move against his former tendency to almost wear out his welcome.
– This one is steeped in Christian tradition – St. Augustine, the Parable of the Thief, Judas, etc.
– Best track is the closer, "I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight." Love that pedal steel work, and the warmth of the track is simply wonderful.
– I love the fact that Dylan released such a simple folk rock record in the year of the flower people.
– Less verbose and grand, no less eccentric.
– Eh – not sure if this one is as great as everyone seems to think. It’s a nice little record, don’t get me wrong, but I suspect it received such rave reviews because it was Dylan reversing course once more. An anti-hype record. A rebellion against the "Summer of Love" and psychedelia. An agrarian manifesto against the age of Aquarius. Or maybe Bob just wanted to make some country music his own way.

see my other Dylan reviews

ATTRIBUTES
Cohesion (4/5)
Consequence (5/5)
Concept (4/5)
Consistency (4/5)
Songs (4/5)

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2 Responses to Quick Review (LP): John Wesley Harding by Bob Dylan

  1. Pingback: Quick Review (LP): Nashville Skyline by Bob Dylan « Sweet Georgia Breezes

  2. Pingback: Career In Brief: Bob Dylan in the 60’s « Sweet Georgia Breezes

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