Tracks of the Decade: “I am trying to break your heart” by Wilco


Wilco
“I am trying to break your heart”
from YANKEE HOTEL FOXTROT
While Thom Yorke was busy sucking lemons, Jeff Tweedy found himself assassining down avenues in the opening track to his own game-changing record. The biggest, boldest statement in Americana this decade begins here, Tweedy borrowing aesthetics and off-the-wall lyrical acumen from the likes of Beck and Silver Jews’ DC Berman and producing an archetypal slacker classic. The song itself would have been enough, but Jim O’Rourke throws in everything but the kitchen sink (actually, it might be in there too) to round this one into a cacophonous avant-folk classic. Tweedy has remarked that he appreciates the ability of music to evoke not just pure emotion but landscapes and buildings in the mind of the listener. That all happens here, as the chronic noise and apathetic churn of the big city comes alive in one glorious open-ended malaise. Yet the track squats in your subconscious with its oddly hypnotic gestures, proving that while it may not travel at light speed, it’s nevertheless one of the classic tracks of the decade.

jefftweedyWilco
“I am trying to break your heart”
from YANKEE HOTEL FOXTROT

While Thom Yorke was busy sucking lemons, Jeff Tweedy found himself assassining down avenues in the opening track to his own game-changing record. The biggest, boldest statement in Americana this decade begins here, Tweedy borrowing aesthetics and off-the-wall lyrical acumen from the likes of Beck and Silver Jews’ DC Berman and producing an archetypal slacker classic. The song itself would have been enough, but Jim O’Rourke throws in everything but the kitchen sink (actually, it might be in there too) to round this one into a cacophonous avant-folk classic. Tweedy has remarked that he appreciates the ability of music to evoke not just pure emotion but landscapes and buildings in the mind of the listener. That all happens here, as the chronic noise and apathetic churn of the big city comes alive in one glorious open-ended malaise. Yet the track squats in your subconscious with its oddly hypnotic gestures, proving that while it may not travel at light speed, it’s nevertheless one of the classic tracks of the decade.

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